Updated
January 31, 2023
COVID test kits
for free again?
High Threat
32.9
98.0
%
%
Heard it
Say it could be true
Most heard it from
TV/radio
Gas stoves will
be banned?
Moderate Threat
21.8
53.1
%
%
Heard it
Say it could be true
Most heard it from
On social media
COVID cases are rising
Moderate Threat
16.5
99.2
%
%
Heard it
Say it could be true
Most heard it from
TV/radio
Health officials
recommend masks?
Moderate Threat
6.0
18.2
97.7
%
%
Heard it
Say it could be true
Most heard it from
TV/radio
RSV cases on the rise?
Moderate Threat
17.1
94.3
%
%
Heard it
Say it could be true
Most heard it from
TV/radio
COVID vaccine causes
heart problem?
Moderate Threat
13.5
62.2
%
%
Heard it
Say it could be true
Most heard it from
Family, friend, or someone else
COVID booster
increases stroke risk?
Moderate Threat
10.0
87.5
%
%
Heard it
Say it could be true
Most heard it from
Other internet source
Variants most common
among boosted?
Moderate Threat
5.9
90.0
%
%
Heard it
Say it could be true
Most heard it from
Other internet source
COVID vaccines
causes variants?
Moderate Threat
8.2
77.3
%
%
Heard it
Say it could be true
Most heard it from
Family, friend, or someone else
New variants emerging?
Low Threat
21.8
98.1
%
%
Heard it
Say it could be true
Most heard it from
TV/radio
COVID test kits for free again?
If you hear this
"COVID-19 self-test kits are available for free, again."
Say this...
The Biden administration has made rapid COVID tests available for free again this winter. Households can now order up to four rapid COVID tests for free at CovidTests.gov. You should test immediately if you have COVID symptoms or 5 days after exposure to COVID. If the result is negative, testing again within 48 hours is encouraged. COVID tests are effective at detecting different variants.

Click here to learn more

Gas stoves will be banned?
If you hear this
"Gas stoves are going to be banned because of climate change."
Say this...
There is currently no plan or effort to ban gas stoves in the US because of climate change. There was a statement made by a US Consumer Safety representative that suggested the possibility of regulations on gas stoves because of evidence that says they are harmful to both human health and the environment. These regulations would apply only to the production of new gas stoves, and getting to these new regulations would likely be a lengthy process.

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COVID cases are rising
If you hear this
"COVID cases are rising"
Say this...
As of November 16, the CDC reported that the national 7-day average of weekly cases decreased 3.2% compared to the previous week. In St. Louis City, positive cases are down 13.2% as of November 15, and new hospitalizations have increased 32.4% compared to the prior week. Precautions like face masking and full vaccination with updated boosters can reduce serious COVID-19 outcomes.

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Health officials recommend masks?
If you hear this
With the "tripledemic" of RSV, flu and COVID surging, health officials might recommend masks in crowded public spaces.
Say this...
Cases of RSV and flu are high in the St. Louis region, and COVID-19 cases are increasing with "high" community transmission in our area. Public health officials are calling the increases in the U.S. a "tripledemic" of COVID-19, flu, and RSV. With rapidly increasing case rates and spread of illness, health officials are encouraging individuals to consider using face masks when in crowded or indoor spaces, particularly in grocery stores, shopping malls, and medical offices (NPR). Masks help prevent all respiratory diseases, not only COVID-19. Other safety measures, such as staying up to date with vaccinations and boosters and frequent hand washing, are also encouraged.

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RSV cases on the rise?
If you hear this
"Many children are being hospitalized for respiratory problems, but the reason is not COVID."
Say this...
Pediatricians in the St. Louis area have reported that cases of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are unusually high for this time of year. Rates typically increase in December and January (KSDK). According to CDC, cases have been rising nationwide since June (CDC). RSV is a common virus that causes infections in the respiratory tract. It can infect individuals of all ages, but the worst outcomes are among newborns and can require hospitalization (CDC).

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COVID vaccine causes heart problem?
If you hear this
"The COVID-19 vaccine can cause heart problems."
Say this...
Myocarditis (inflammation of the heart muscle) has rarely been reported in individuals receiving the COVID-19 vaccine. The risk of heart inflammation is much higher after COVID infection than after being vaccinated for COVID. Vaccine protection against serious COVID infection continues to outweigh the risk of heart inflammation after vaccination.

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COVID booster increases stroke risk?
If you hear this
"Pfizer's COVID-19 booster increases the risk of stroke in people 65 and older."
Say this...
On January 13, 2023 the CDC announced that a vaccine safety monitoring system called Vaccine Safety Datalink picked up a "safety signal" possibly linking Pfizer's COVID-19 bivalent vaccine with an increased risk of stroke in people 65 and older. After an extensive review of the latest vaccine safety data from several other vaccine safety monitoring systems, federal health officials said it is very unlikely that there is a true clinical risk of stroke associated with Pfizer's COVID-19 booster. The safety systems that monitor COVID-19 vaccine safety are the most extensive in U.S. history. The COVID-19 vaccines and updated boosters are safe. Getting vaccinated and boosted remains the best defense against serious illness and hospitalization due to COVID-19.

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Variants most common among boosted?
If you hear this
"New COVID-19 variants are most common in boosted people."
Say this...
There is no evidence that people who have received a COVID-19 booster are more likely to get a new variant. New COVID variants emerge when mutations occur in the virus's genetic code. These mutations happen when the virus replicates, and lead to variants such as Omicron and XBB 1.5. New mutations are expected to occur, and the CDC continues to monitor their development. Getting boosted improves the body's immune response to COVID.

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COVID vaccines causes variants?
If you hear this
"COVID-19 vaccines are causing more variants to develop."
Say this...
COVID-19 variants, like omicron and its subvariants XBB.1.5, BA.5, and BA.4, are caused by mutations in the virus' genetic code. Mutations happen when the virus makes copies of itself (replication) and infects people. Vaccines can help prevent variants from developing because they can help prevent infections.

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New variants emerging?
If you hear this
"New variants of the coronavirus are emerging."
Say this...
The CDC has detected a new COVID-19 variant in the U.S. -- XBB.1.5. The new variant now accounts for 41% of all COVID cases, up from just 4% one month ago (CDC). The severity of disease caused by these sub-variants and how well they escape the body's immune system is still unclear.

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TOP CONCERNS THIS WEEK
1  COVID test kits for free again?
2  Gas stoves will be banned?
3  COVID cases are rising
4  Health officials recommend masks?
5  RSV cases on the rise?